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Tonight Statik Selektah’s album release lucky 7 @ Santos party house NYC 100% Pure Hip Hop Don’t miss it, too many surprise guests to name!

The official album release party for Statik Selektah’s Lucky 7  is going down TONIGHT at the legendary Santos Party House in New York City.  

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BUY THE LUCKY 7 ALBUM + MORE INCREDIBLE HIP HOP ALBUMS FROM STATIK SELEKTAH’S DISCOGRAPHY @

Website: http://showoffhiphop.com

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Lucky 7 : Track list 

1. Intro ft. Hannibal Buress
2. Another Level ft. Rapsody
3. Beautiful Life ft. Action Bronson & Joey Bada$$
4. Hood Boogers ft Your Old Droog & Chauncy Sherod
5. The Locker Room ft. Dave East
6. In The Wind ft. Joey Bada$$, Big K.R.I.T. & Chauncy Sherod
7. Crystal Clear ft. Royce Da 5’9”
8. How You Feel ft. Mick Jenkins
9. Murder Game ft. Smif N Wessun, Young M.A & Buckshot
10. Gentlemen ft. Illa Ghee, Sean Price & Fame of M.O.P.
11. Bodega! Ft. Bodega Bamz
12. The Trophy Room ft. Skyzoo, Ea$y Money, Domo Genesis & Masspike Miles
13. Sucker Free ft. JFK
14. Wall Flowers ft Your Old Droog, Termanology, & Lord Sear
15. Top Tier ft. Sean Price, Bun B, & Styles P
16. Silver Lining ft. ASAP Twelvyy, Kirk Knight, & Chauncy Sherod
17. Cold ft. Wais P & Jared Evan
18. All You Need ft. Action Bronson, Ab-Soul, & Elle Varner
19. Scratch Off ft. CJ Fly, Talib Kweli & Cane
20. Alone ft. Joey Bada$$
21. Harley’s Blues

 

Today! June 23: FROM MAMBO TO HIP HOP: BRONX 7:30-10pm. Free! Outdoor Screening

ARTS IN THE GARDENS: SCREENING OF :

“FROM MAMBO TO HIP HOP”

Rescheduled Due to Weather: Tuesday, June 23, 7:30pm to 10:00pm

7:30 to 8:30pm DJ David Medina

8:30 to 9:30pm Film
9:30pm to 10pm Q&A with director Henry Chalfant

Free admission

Location: Target Community Garden, 1025 Anderson Avenue, Bronx, NY

About From Mambo to Hip Hop
Produced by Elena Martínez and Steve Zeitlin, directed by Henry Chalfant. 56 minutes.
Even in its darkest period, the Bronx created young hip hop artists in music, dance, art, and poetry in the forms of deejay mixes, b-boying, graffiti, and rap. Chalfant shows how closely linked are the two cultures of salsa and breaking.

New York City’s borough of the South Bronx was home to many of the new immigrants from Puerto Rico, Cuba, and other Caribbean islands in the late 40s and early 50s. Machito had already made his musical mark with his Afro-Cuban mixture of Caribbean music and jazz. Mambo ruled the dance floor. Soon Ray Barreto, Willie Colon, and Eddie Palmieri joined existing bands and then formed their own groups to introduce new songs, rhythms, and dances, all of which eventually led to the salsa revolution of the 1970s.  The Fania All-Stars propelled salsa across the nation and beyond.

Growing up in the midst of salsa rhythms, younger dancers, both African American and Latinos, responded most strongly to the instrumental “breaks” being selected by deejays rebelling against the disco craze of the 70s. Soon mixes of these breaks became the music for “break dancers” (eventually known as b-boys/b-girls).