Tag Archives: kendrick lamar

U2 & Kendrick Lamar Song Collaboration “American Soul”

Kung Fu Kenny and Bono’s boys are back together for a track that bridges the gap between those two previous collaborations, “American Soul”.  “American Soul” appears to be the song Lamar sampled for “XXX.”, as Bono’s first lines appear in both tracks. It also seems to bleed right out of “Get Out of Your Own Way”, as Lamar opens with the same blessings with which he ended the previous single.   It’s also a pro-immigration and refugee call, as Bono sings lines like, “It’s not a place/ This country is to me a thought/ That offers grace/ For every welcome that is sought.”

https://consequenceofsound.net/2017/11/u2-shares-new-kendrick-lamar-collaboration-american-soul-stream/

The Best Hip-Hop Protest Songs Ever

When Eminem released his freestyle as part of the BET Hip Hop Awards’ annual cypher, it turned out to be a 4-plus-minute a capella tirade against President Donald Trump. He indicted the president for his most egregious transgressions: perpetuating racism, emboldening white supremacy, his irresponsibility with North Korea, the attacks on black NFL players, his abandonment of Puerto Rico. The list goes on.

Hip-hop fans, athletes, and mainstream media, praised the lukewarm freestyle as urgent, necessary, powerful and genius. “After 27 years of doubts about rap I am now a fan,” sports and political commentator Keith Olberman tweeted. “Best political writing of the year, period.”

To suggest that Eminem’s mediocre bars were anything other than tepid demonstrates a a shamefully low bar for the craft of hip-hop and for what constitutes bravery. To declare that Eminem’s freestyle about Trump is a turning point in hip-hop is lazy, uninformed. That’s not surprising, though. White artists are often lauded for their courage in speaking out against injustice, while black artists are often overlooked or penalized for the same actions. When Beyoncé showed up to the Superbowl in an outfit that honored the Black Panthers, conservatives slammed her and the police union called for a boycott of her subsequent world tour.

The reality is, rappers have been criticizing the government, picking apart systems of oppression and addressing the pervasiveness of police brutality in black communities since the art form’s inception. It’s why rapper and Public Enemy member Chuck D famously dubbed hip-hop “the black CNN” decades ago.

“To Pimp A Butterfly,” Kendrick Lamar, 2015

“Changes,” 2Pac, 1992

“Georgia… Bush,” Lil Wayne2006

“Be Free,” J. Cole2014

“Untitled,” Nas2008

“Fuck the Police,” NWA1988

“Fight the Power,” Public Enemy1989

“A Song for Assata,” Common2000

“Police State,” Dead Prez2000

“Revolution,” Arrested Development1992

“Reagan,” Killer Mike2012

“The Point of No Return,” Geto Boys1996

“Words I Never Said,” Lupe Fiasco2011

“The Message,” Grandmaster Flash & The Furious Five1982

“Sound of Da Police,” KRS-One1993

“Bin Laden,” Immortal Technique feat. Yasiin Bey, Jadakiss, Eminem2005

How Hip-Hop Found a Home on Daytime TV

“Performing for the first time on daytime television … ” is an introduction Ellen DeGeneres uses often on her syndicated talk show. And in the past two years, the phrase has preceded appearances by such hip-hop heavyweights as Kendrick Lamar, Future, Migos, Travis Scott and Chance the Rapper, among others. Like many a TV marriage, it may be unlikely, but it works.

“Other shows put on music to fill a hole,” says co-executive producer Jonathan Norman, who oversees music bookings (season 15 premieres Sept. 5, with Pink appearing the next day). But DeGeneres targeted big stars. “When we launched ‘Ellen,’ she wanted Eminem, Bono and Justin Timberlake.” (Timberlake would appear on the show’s second episode in 2003.) The rise in hip-hop bookings, he adds, “stems, first and foremost, from Ellen’s love of the genre and those artists.” Second, “hip-hop is ever-present.”

Indeed, according to the 2017 mid-year report by music analytics firm BuzzAngle, hip-hop/rap is the top genre in overall song consumption, accounting for 21% of listening (pop is a distant second, at 14.3%), and has grown 48.6% compared with the same six-month period in 2016. And as acts like Lamar, Scott, French Montana, Big Sean, and DJ Khaled cross over to pop on terrestrial and satellite radio and via popular streaming playlists, it would stand to reason that mainstream programs, even those that air when the sun is out, would embrace the genre too.

Yet “Ellen,” which averaged 2.9 million viewers in its 14th season in 2016-17, seems to be the outlier — or the trailblazer — on daytime. That’s partly due to the sheer volume of music on the show per season. Norman cites that number at between 100 and 110 performances annually, and adds, “Nobody on daytime has that many.”

“Moms are getting hipper to the music earlier.
JOIE MANDA, INTERSCOPE GEFFEN A&M

 

http://variety.com/2017/music/news/hip-hop-daytime-tv-ellen-1202547947/

MultiHop Presents U.K. Rapper Akala

It is safe to say that hip-hop has evolved since DJ Kool Herc a.k.a. Clive Campbell laid the groundwork for what would soon become the outlet for black youth to express their angst at a party in South Bronx in 1973.

Following a rap reconfiguring that took place around 2010 in the States, new school artists like Future and Kendrick Lamar have become the faces of mainstream hip-hop, with some millennials preferring their music to their predecessors including Tupac and NWA.

Purists from the older generation argue that a lack of respect for pioneers like Big Daddy Kane, Grandmaster Flash and the Furious Five member Keith “Cowboy” Wiggins who paved the way has spawned the mumble rap, a vague subgenre of hip-hop music.

Earlier this year rapper Slaughterhouse MC Joe Budden accused Lil Yachty of ruining the culture and trying to re-write what it meant to be hip-hop with his liberal use of autotune and his portrayal of masculinity.

“I don’t think the divide is generational, I think the divide is about taste,” Akala, real name Kingslee James Daley told IBTimes UK. “This has been a debate as long as hip-hop has existed, in fact any genre. You’ve got the purists or the people that consider themselves purists, and you’ve got the rest.”

http://www.msn.com/en-gb/entertainment/story/legacy-of-hip-hop-akala-believes-taste-divides-generations/ar-AApSCkL

12th Straight Week for Kendrick Lamar’s ‘DAMN’ Remains In The Top 3 Of The Billboard 200

After leading the Billboard 200 for three weeks, Kendrick Lamar’s DAMN continues to be one of the most popular albums in the country.

The Top Dawg Entertainment release debuted at #1 on the chart the week ending April 20. Since that time, DAMN has yet to fall below #3 on the list. That means the critically acclaimed album has spent 12 straight weeks in the Top 3.

https://allhiphop.com/2017/07/10/kendrick-lamars-damn-remains-in-the-top-3-of-the-billboard-200-for-12th-straight-week/

 

Kendrick Lamar’s ‘Damn’ On Pace to Do Bigger First-Week Numbers Than Drake’s ‘More Life’

Damn has certified Kendrick Lamar’s spot at the top of the game, and based on the latest sales projections, he’s about to reach new heights as an artist. The latest album for K-Dot is expected to debut as the No. 1 album on the Billboard 200 chart and pass Drake’s More Life by having the biggest first week of any project in 2017.

More Life set the 2017 bar for first-week sales after moving 505,000 equivalent units in its first week, but Damn is currently on pace to move between 530,000 and 550,000 equivalent album units in its first week.  It’s also expected to set a new high for traditional album sales in a week, as Kendrick is currently on track to move 330,000 traditional units in week one, which would beat the year’s high set by Ed Sheeran’s Divide with 322,000.

Independent of his competition, this is a massive leap for Kendrick, whose biggest sales week to date came courtesy of 2015’s To Pimp A Butterfly. Being at the head of the sales pack in his debut week is the only part that isn’t groundbreaking for Kendrick—this marks his third consecutive project to debut at No. 1, following the success of To Pimp A Butterfly and 2016’s Untitled Unmastered.

K-Dot has come a long way in terms of popularity and more success could be on the way. His single “Humble” debuted at No. 2 on the Hot 100 chart, and his collaboration with Rihanna on “Loyalty” has a ton of potential as a single. Even his music videos are star-studded, with actor Don Cheadle guest starring in the video for “DNA”, the banger laced by Mike Will Made-It.

Damn is everywhere right now, from your car speakers to the background of the NBA Playoffs. And if its first-week sales are any indication, it’s an album you should expect to hear on repeat for much of 2017.

Article Courtesy of Complex

http://www.complex.com/music/2017/04/kendrick-lamar-damn-bigger-first-week-numbers-than-drake-more-life

MULTIHOP.TV HIGHLIGHTS Kendrick Lamar Inspired the “Be Alright” High Tech High Scholarship

North Bergen, New Jersey, High Tech High English teacher Brian Mooney used Kendrick Lamar’s recent studio album as curriculum.

Students used lyrics from Lamar’s sophomore album, To Pimp A Butterfly, to draw parallels between their assigned reading material of Toni Morrison’s The Bluest Eye.

 

 

MultiHop.TV HighLights Kendrick Lamar Unites Gangs With His New Reebok Sneakers

The photos of Kendrick Lamar’s first Reebok sneaker have been revealed and they continue with this same trend and mentality. Rather than making the sneakers available in separate colors, Kendrick’s version of the Reebok Ventilators come with blue accents on the left side and red accents on the right—forcing these two strongly represented colors to come together.

Each tongue pull is inscribed with “Kendrick Lamar” and “TDE” with blue and red tags inside that read “Neutral.” The right heel displays “Red” and the left reads “Blue,” capped off by a gum sole and rope shoe laces.

The sneakers are part of Kendrick’s ongoing effort to spread positivity. The Compton rapper, who received  the 35th Senate District’s Generational Icon Award, has donated hundreds of thousands of dollars to support music, sports, and after-school programs in his hometown.

The Kendrick Lamar x Reebok Ventilator will be available starting July 18 for $142.