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Latino USA presents : ‘A Latino History of Hip-Hop’ Part : 1 & 2

Latino USA is the foremost Latino voice in public media and the longest running Latino-focused program on radio.

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Website: Latinousa.org

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For the first part of a two-part series on how Latinos have influenced hip-hop Latino USA producers Daisy Rosario and Marlon Bishop learn about the early years by talking to legends like Devastating Tito, Lee Quiñones, and Charlie Chase. They break down the four elements of hip-hop: MCing, DJing, graffiti, and break dancing and explore how New York City made it all possible.

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Much is inferred when we say the word “Hip-Hop” and it isn’t always positive but besides that, it usually is tagged as a “Black” thing. Totally unfair and un-true! Ensconced in the global roots of the genre, are Latino giants who after all these years, continue to be overlooked or overshadowed due to the “Black and White” mindset as my interview subject Daisy Rosario so aptly put it.

Rosario and her cohort Marlon Bishop, decided enough was enough, and pulled together an audio documentary which celebrates Hip-Hop from the Latino perspective. A much needed conversation, the series brings us the stories, insights and perspectives of Latinos who have on both coasts, set the stage and laid the foundation for much of what we call “Real Hip-Hop,” outside of any racial lines. They helped create and elevate the craft as well as define the “pillars” accepted as basic tenets of Hip-Hop as a whole.

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“A Latino History of Hip-Hop” Part II Episode, a continuation of “A Latino History of Hip-Hop, Part I,”  air[s] [today] on Friday, June 5. While Part I, which aired on March 20, examined the origins of Hip-Hop in New York City, Part II will explore the profound contributions of Latinos to Hip-Hop culture from the late 80’s to present day, focusing primarily on the music in major U.S. cities, such as New York, Los Angeles and Miami. Latino influence on hip-hop culture is so widely overlooked. 

The segment examines the legacy of the late Big Pun (Christipher Lee Rios), the first Latin rapper to go ever platinum and emerge from the underground Hip-Hop scene in The Bronx. Additionally, the show features special guest Mellow Man Ace, who’s Spanglish hit “Mentirosa” put Latinos on the West Coast hip-hop map. Other guests include rising Puerto Rican star Bodega Bamz and Miami’s DJ Laz. (LatinoUSA.org)

Latino USA (latinousa.org) is a radio program distributed by National Public Radio (NPR). Check out our exclusive interview with series co-creator Daisy Rosario below!

A Latino History of Hip-Hop, Part I: NOW on LatinoUSA.org

 

A Latino History of Hip-Hop, Part 2: NOW on LatinoUSA.org

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For the second part of a two-part series on how Latinos have influenced hip-hop, Latino USA producers Daisy Rosario and Marlon Bishop explore what happens when rap music becomes big business. We hear from Spanglish rap pioneer Mellow Man Ace, chat with radio personalities Bobbito Garcia and Cipha Sounds, find out about how DJ Laz put his spin on Miami bass, and we pay tribute to the legendary Big Pun.

 

Daisy Rosario

Daisy Rosario is a comedian, writer and producer of things from radio stories to live events. Recently graduated from the CUNY Graduate School of Journalism, she also works with The Moth and the Upright CitizensBrigade Theatre. Daisy has interned at Radiolab, taken a play she directed to the Edinburgh Fringe Festival, and is an obsessive baseball fan. Her story “Child of Trouble,” was featured on the Peabody award-winning Moth Radio Hour. She holds a BFA from NYU’s Tisch School of the Arts.

Marlon Bishop

Marlon Bishop is a radio producer and journalist with a focus on Latin America, New York City, music and the arts. He got his start in radio producing long-form documentaries on Latin music history for the public radio program Afropop Worldwide. After a stint reporting for the culture desk at New York Public Radio (WNYC), Marlon spent several years writing for MTV Iggy, MTV”s portal for global music and pop culture. Marlon has also lived and traveled all over Latin America, reporting stories as a freelancer for NPR, Studio 360, The World, the Village Voice, Billboard and Fusion, among other outlets. He is currently a staff Producer for Latino USA.

Hip-Hop Pioneers Plan a Museum for the Bronx .. To showcase the history & legacy of Hip Hop culture & elements

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Before hip-hop became a musical genre, it was a form of expression — and an escape — for its early creators in the Bronx.

Now some of those elders of the genre want to underscore its Bronx roots by opening a hip-hop museum inside the Kingsbridge Armory, a long-empty fortress that is being redeveloped into a national ice sports center. The museum — to be called the Universal Hip Hop Museum — would utilize interactive technology to provide a comprehensive look at hip-hop, including its historical and cultural roots and the contributions of break dancers and disc jockeys, according to museum organizers.

“Many people have a misconception of what hip-hop is,” said Afrika Bambaataa, who is often called the godfather of hip-hop and will serve as the museum’s chairman. “When they say hip-hop, they only say it’s the rapper, and there’s a whole culture and movement behind it.”

The plan for the museum was announced by a group of hip-hop artists and their supporters at a news conference in front of City Hall on Wednesday after a City Council ceremony inside to honor the achievements of Mr. Bambaataa and other early hip-hop pioneers, including Grandmaster Melle Mel, Grandmaster Caz and Grand Wizard Theodore. The new museum, which is still being developed, is the latest in a line of efforts to honor hip-hop that date back to at least the mid-1990s.

In a separate project, Craig Wilson, co-founder of the National Museum of Hip-Hop, said that he was in negotiations with developers to open his museum in Harlem, though he added that he would consider a proposed location in the Bronx. But citing studies on foot traffic and tourists, he added that “the numbers in Manhattan make more sense financially than in the Bronx.”

Rocky Bucano, the president of the planned Universal Hip Hop Museum, said that their effort was different because it had the backing of Mr. Bambaataa and other artists who have agreed to serve on an advisory committee for the museum and raise money on its behalf. He said that they hoped to open in the armory by 2017. “Since we started the art form,” he said, “we think we should have the most invested in it.”

The redevelopment of the Kingsbridge Armory will include 52,000 square feet of space dedicated to community use, said Councilman Fernando Cabrera, whose district includes the armory.

Mr. Cabrera said that while he supported the idea of a hip-hop museum, the final decision would be made by an advisory board that was still being appointed to oversee the community benefits from the armory. He added that about a dozen community groups have expressed interest in using space at the armory, including a youth basketball program.

Grandmaster Melle Mel said that a hip-hop museum could draw tourists to the Bronx and become a destination like Yankee Stadium. “If you just keep it on the music level it cheapens it,” he said. “To embrace it as an art form, that’s what makes it a museum.”

krs one speaks on the great hip-hop museum debate

http://youtu.be/_k5zM-d82iY